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Indian Ragamala Plate

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Price: $12.00
Member Price: $10.80

Item# 80-010890 







Description

In the royal courts of northern India in the sixteenth century, music, painting, and poetry came together in the production of miniature paintings known as ragamala (garland of ragas), pictorial representations of musical modes. A raga is a musical phrase that stirs an emotional response in the listener, associated with a particular time of day, season, and mood. Our plate is based on a folio from a vivid ragamala in the Museums collection, probably painted in Ahmadnager about 158090.

Glass. For decorative use only. 4'' square.

  • Glass
  • For decorative use only
  • 4'' square

Art History

The "Deccan" (derived from Dakshina) is a geographical term that refers to the plateau in south central India still ruled by Hindu kings when the first Muslim sultanates of India were established in Delhi. In the late fifteenth century, the provinces of the Bahmanid dynasty broke off into separate states, each with a vibrant and distinct culture flourishing mainly in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. The art, poetry, and music of the Deccani courts were marked by an affinity for Persia. These courts, namely Bijapur, Golconda, Ahmadnagar, Bidar, and Berar, were known for their unique techniques of casting metal, carving stone, and painting.

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Description

In the royal courts of northern India in the sixteenth century, music, painting, and poetry came together in the production of miniature paintings known as ragamala (garland of ragas), pictorial representations of musical modes. A raga is a musical phrase that stirs an emotional response in the listener, associated with a particular time of day, season, and mood. Our plate is based on a folio from a vivid ragamala in the Museums collection, probably painted in Ahmadnager about 158090.

Glass. For decorative use only. 4'' square.




  • Glass
  • For decorative use only
  • 4'' square




Art History

The "Deccan" (derived from Dakshina) is a geographical term that refers to the plateau in south central India still ruled by Hindu kings when the first Muslim sultanates of India were established in Delhi. In the late fifteenth century, the provinces of the Bahmanid dynasty broke off into separate states, each with a vibrant and distinct culture flourishing mainly in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. The art, poetry, and music of the Deccani courts were marked by an affinity for Persia. These courts, namely Bijapur, Golconda, Ahmadnagar, Bidar, and Berar, were known for their unique techniques of casting metal, carving stone, and painting.


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