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Pearl Flower Teardrop Earrings

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Price: $45.00
Member Price: $40.50

Item# 80-022370 







Description

Charles Germain de Saint-Aubin (17211786), a designer to the French king Louis XV, published a treatise on embroidery in 1770 that has become one of the most important sources of technical information on eighteenth-century needlework. His book included specific instructions on a great variety of stitches incorporating silk floss, metal threads, and glass beads. Our beguiling earrings are based on an exquisite detail from an eighteenth-century French skirt in the Museums collection, which is meticulously embroidered in metal thread on lustrous pale green silk.

18K gold overlay, with cultured freshwater pearls. 1 1/4''L. Pierced, with gold-filled wires.

  • 18K gold overlay, with cultured freshwater pearls
  • 1 1/4''L
  • Pierced, with gold-filled wires

Art History

Throughout the eighteenth century, the French nobility were major consumers of elaborate embroideries. Individual designers and embroiderers were often retained by a monarch or employed by a noble household to embellish garments, furnishings, and decorations, both for everyday use and special occasions.

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Description

Charles Germain de Saint-Aubin (17211786), a designer to the French king Louis XV, published a treatise on embroidery in 1770 that has become one of the most important sources of technical information on eighteenth-century needlework. His book included specific instructions on a great variety of stitches incorporating silk floss, metal threads, and glass beads. Our beguiling earrings are based on an exquisite detail from an eighteenth-century French skirt in the Museums collection, which is meticulously embroidered in metal thread on lustrous pale green silk.

18K gold overlay, with cultured freshwater pearls. 1 1/4''L. Pierced, with gold-filled wires.





  • 18K gold overlay, with cultured freshwater pearls
  • 1 1/4''L
  • Pierced, with gold-filled wires




Art History

Throughout the eighteenth century, the French nobility were major consumers of elaborate embroideries. Individual designers and embroiderers were often retained by a monarch or employed by a noble household to embellish garments, furnishings, and decorations, both for everyday use and special occasions.


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