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Stieglitz, Steichen, Strand

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Price: $35.00
Member Price: $31.50

Item# 80-008609 







Description

By Malcolm Daniel

Alfred Stieglitz (American, 1864–1946), Edward Steichen (American, b. Luxembourg, 1879–1973), and Paul Strand (American, 1890–1976) are among the most famous photographers of the twentieth century. This handsome volume showcases for the first time the Metropolitan Museum’s extraordinarily rich holdings of works by these diverse and groundbreaking masters.

A passionate advocate for photography and modern art promoted through his “Little Galleries of the Photo-Secession” (also known as “291”) and his journal Camera Work, Stieglitz was also a photographer of supreme accomplishment. Featured works by Stieglitz include portraits, landscapes, city views, and cloud studies, along with photographs from his composite portrait of Georgia O’Keeffe (selected by O’Keeffe herself for the Museum). Steichen— perhaps best known as a fashion photographer, celebrity portraitist, and MoMA curator—was Stieglitz’s man in Paris, gallery collaborator, and most talented exemplar of Photo-Secessionist photography. His three large variant prints of The Flatiron and his moonlit photographs of Rodin’s Balzac are highlighted here. Marking a pivotal moment in the course of photography, the final double issue of Camera Work (1915–17) was devoted to the young Paul Strand, whose photographs from 1915 and 1916 treated three principal themes—movement in the city, abstractions, and street portraits— and pioneered a shift from the soft-focus Pictorialist aesthetic to the straight approach and graphic power of an emerging modernism. Represented are Strand’s rare large platinum prints—most of them unique exhibition prints of images popularly known only as Camera Work photogravures.

Winner of an Independent Publishers Book Silver Medal and a New York Book Show Award.

180 pages, 130 full-color illustrations. 10'' x 12''. Hardcover, with jacket.

  • 180 pages
  • 130 full-color illustrations
  • 10'' x 12''
  • Hardcover
  • with jacket

Editorial Reviews

“…illuminating essay for the catalogue…”
      —New York Daily News

"…a beautifully produced catalogue of the ‘big three’ of the early twentieth-century American photography.”
      —The Guardian

“The perfect primer to these essential artists who saw photography through its infancy as a fine art and helped find it a place in the pantheon.”
       —Big Think

“…fine catalog essay by curator Malcolm Daniel…”
      —The Wall Street Journal

“A beautifully presented collection of superior works by the big three, this will be of great interest to photographers and aesthetes across the board.”
      —Library Journal

“This breathtaking exhibition catalog from the Met is a wonderful look at three vital and influential American photographers.”
      —Arkansas Democrat-Gazette

“A rare chance to see the three photographers who broke new ground for early practitioners.”
      —Daily Telegraph

Customer Reviews




Description

By Malcolm Daniel

Alfred Stieglitz (American, 1864–1946), Edward Steichen (American, b. Luxembourg, 1879–1973), and Paul Strand (American, 1890–1976) are among the most famous photographers of the twentieth century. This handsome volume showcases for the first time the Metropolitan Museum’s extraordinarily rich holdings of works by these diverse and groundbreaking masters.

A passionate advocate for photography and modern art promoted through his “Little Galleries of the Photo-Secession” (also known as “291”) and his journal Camera Work, Stieglitz was also a photographer of supreme accomplishment. Featured works by Stieglitz include portraits, landscapes, city views, and cloud studies, along with photographs from his composite portrait of Georgia O’Keeffe (selected by O’Keeffe herself for the Museum). Steichen— perhaps best known as a fashion photographer, celebrity portraitist, and MoMA curator—was Stieglitz’s man in Paris, gallery collaborator, and most talented exemplar of Photo-Secessionist photography. His three large variant prints of The Flatiron and his moonlit photographs of Rodin’s Balzac are highlighted here. Marking a pivotal moment in the course of photography, the final double issue of Camera Work (1915–17) was devoted to the young Paul Strand, whose photographs from 1915 and 1916 treated three principal themes—movement in the city, abstractions, and street portraits— and pioneered a shift from the soft-focus Pictorialist aesthetic to the straight approach and graphic power of an emerging modernism. Represented are Strand’s rare large platinum prints—most of them unique exhibition prints of images popularly known only as Camera Work photogravures.

Winner of an Independent Publishers Book Silver Medal and a New York Book Show Award.

180 pages, 130 full-color illustrations. 10'' x 12''. Hardcover, with jacket.





  • 180 pages
  • 130 full-color illustrations
  • 10'' x 12''
  • Hardcover
  • with jacket




Editorial Reviews

“…illuminating essay for the catalogue…”
      —New York Daily News

"…a beautifully produced catalogue of the ‘big three’ of the early twentieth-century American photography.”
      —The Guardian

“The perfect primer to these essential artists who saw photography through its infancy as a fine art and helped find it a place in the pantheon.”
       —Big Think

“…fine catalog essay by curator Malcolm Daniel…”
      —The Wall Street Journal

“A beautifully presented collection of superior works by the big three, this will be of great interest to photographers and aesthetes across the board.”
      —Library Journal

“This breathtaking exhibition catalog from the Met is a wonderful look at three vital and influential American photographers.”
      —Arkansas Democrat-Gazette

“A rare chance to see the three photographers who broke new ground for early practitioners.”
      —Daily Telegraph


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