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Fleur-De-Lis Ring

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Price From$37.50
Price: $150.00 $37.50
Member Price: $135.00 $33.75

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Description

The Museums jewelry is developed from the eighteenth century armor of five year old Infante Luis (17011724), Prince of Asturias. Luis was the first Spanish-born Bourbon heir to the throne of Spain and ruled briefly as Luis I in 1724. Remarkable for its state of preservation, the armor retains its lustrous blue and gold surfaces and nearly all its original red-silk lining. The gilt rivet heads are of heraldic designthe lions of Len, the castles of Castile, and the fleurs-de-lis of France representing the dynastic claims to which Luis was heir. These fleur-de-lis rivet heads were the inspiration for the Fleur-De-Lis Ring.

Available in size 10, 11, or 12. Sterling silver. Oxidized finish. 3/4'' square.

  • Available in size 10, 11, or 12
  • Sterling silver
  • Oxidized finish
  • 3/4'' square

Art History

The military training for the sons of aristocrats and knights began at an early age. This included horsemanship, the use of various weapons, and the wearing of armor. A boys first armor not only helped prepare him for the adult-sized harnesses he might later wear on the battlefield or in tournaments, but it also was a symbol of his elevated social status and his potential as a future leader of men. One of the latest of these boys armors, and perhaps the last royal armor made in Europe, is in the Metropolitan Museums collection. It is believed to have been made for and belonged to the five-year-old Infante Luis, Prince of Asturias. The armor is signed and dated on the backplate: "Drouar Ordinaire du Roi aux Heaume Paris 1712" (Drouar, [armorer-in-] ordinary to the King, at the Sign of the Helmet in Paris, 1712). The signature probably refers to Jean Drouart (died by 1715), who was most likely one of the last armorers active in France by that date.

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Description

The Museums jewelry is developed from the eighteenth century armor of five year old Infante Luis (17011724), Prince of Asturias. Luis was the first Spanish-born Bourbon heir to the throne of Spain and ruled briefly as Luis I in 1724. Remarkable for its state of preservation, the armor retains its lustrous blue and gold surfaces and nearly all its original red-silk lining. The gilt rivet heads are of heraldic designthe lions of Len, the castles of Castile, and the fleurs-de-lis of France representing the dynastic claims to which Luis was heir. These fleur-de-lis rivet heads were the inspiration for the Fleur-De-Lis Ring.

Available in size 10, 11, or 12. Sterling silver. Oxidized finish. 3/4'' square.





  • Available in size 10, 11, or 12
  • Sterling silver
  • Oxidized finish
  • 3/4'' square




Art History

The military training for the sons of aristocrats and knights began at an early age. This included horsemanship, the use of various weapons, and the wearing of armor. A boys first armor not only helped prepare him for the adult-sized harnesses he might later wear on the battlefield or in tournaments, but it also was a symbol of his elevated social status and his potential as a future leader of men. One of the latest of these boys armors, and perhaps the last royal armor made in Europe, is in the Metropolitan Museums collection. It is believed to have been made for and belonged to the five-year-old Infante Luis, Prince of Asturias. The armor is signed and dated on the backplate: "Drouar Ordinaire du Roi aux Heaume Paris 1712" (Drouar, [armorer-in-] ordinary to the King, at the Sign of the Helmet in Paris, 1712). The signature probably refers to Jean Drouart (died by 1715), who was most likely one of the last armorers active in France by that date.


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