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Cherry Blossom Bookmark

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Price: $16.95
Member Price: $15.25

Item# 10-092567 







Description

Suijin Shrine and Massaki on the Sumida River is the thirty-fifth print in Utagawa Hiroshige's (Japanese, 17971858) Views of Edo series. In depicting the spring season with a view of the Sumida River, the right side of the image is framed with double-petalled cherry blossoms. These pink cherry blossoms capture and hold our attention in contrast to the serene restful beauty of the landscape below. Our lovely Cherry Blossom Bookmark is adapted from this print.

Silver-plated brass with applied color. 4 3/8'' x 1 1/8''.

  • 4 3/8'' x 1 1/8''
  • Silver-plated brass with applied color

Art History

One of the great Japanese landscape artists, Utagawa Hiroshige created views of his native Japan that are celebrated throughout the world. In his extraordinary series of woodblock prints now in the Brooklyn Museum of Arts collection, One Hundred Famous Views of Edo, Hiroshige developed a style of sharply juxtaposed bold foreground elements as a framing device with distant views. His style blends Western influences with the meisho Japanese tradition.

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Description

Suijin Shrine and Massaki on the Sumida River is the thirty-fifth print in Utagawa Hiroshige's (Japanese, 17971858) Views of Edo series. In depicting the spring season with a view of the Sumida River, the right side of the image is framed with double-petalled cherry blossoms. These pink cherry blossoms capture and hold our attention in contrast to the serene restful beauty of the landscape below. Our lovely Cherry Blossom Bookmark is adapted from this print.

Silver-plated brass with applied color. 4 3/8'' x 1 1/8''.





  • 4 3/8'' x 1 1/8''
  • Silver-plated brass with applied color




Art History

One of the great Japanese landscape artists, Utagawa Hiroshige created views of his native Japan that are celebrated throughout the world. In his extraordinary series of woodblock prints now in the Brooklyn Museum of Arts collection, One Hundred Famous Views of Edo, Hiroshige developed a style of sharply juxtaposed bold foreground elements as a framing device with distant views. His style blends Western influences with the meisho Japanese tradition.


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