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Louis C. Tiffany Favrile Notecard Box

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Price: $21.95
Member Price: $19.75

Item# 80-022642 







Description

The images reproduced on these notecards are details of original Favrile glass designed by Louis Comfort Tiffany (American, 18481933) from the Museums collection.

Includes 20 notecards (5 each of 4 images), 12 gift enclosures (6 each of 2 images), 34 color-lined envelopes, and 35 self-adhesive seals. Box: 6 1/8''W x 4 1/2''H x 4 3/4''D; notecards: 4'' x 5 1/4''; gift enclosures: 2 3/4'' x 3 3/4''.

  • Includes 20 notecards (5 each of 4 images), 12 gift enclosures (6 each of 2 images), 34 color-lined envelopes, and 35 self-adhesive seals
  • Box: 6 1/8''W x 4 1/2''H x 4 3/4''D; notecards: 4'' x 5 1/4''; gift enclosures: 2 3/4'' x 3 3/4''

Art History

A master of many media, Louis Comfort Tiffany (American, 18481933) was one of Americas most noted decorative artists at the turn of the twentieth century. In the early 1890s he developed a method of blending different colors together in glass while it was in a molten state, thus achieving subtle effects of shading and texture. The artist called this type of glass, which was often noted for its iridescence, Favrile glass (from fabrile, an Old English word meaning hand-wrought).

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Description

The images reproduced on these notecards are details of original Favrile glass designed by Louis Comfort Tiffany (American, 18481933) from the Museums collection.

Includes 20 notecards (5 each of 4 images), 12 gift enclosures (6 each of 2 images), 34 color-lined envelopes, and 35 self-adhesive seals. Box: 6 1/8''W x 4 1/2''H x 4 3/4''D; notecards: 4'' x 5 1/4''; gift enclosures: 2 3/4'' x 3 3/4''.




  • Includes 20 notecards (5 each of 4 images), 12 gift enclosures (6 each of 2 images), 34 color-lined envelopes, and 35 self-adhesive seals
  • Box: 6 1/8''W x 4 1/2''H x 4 3/4''D; notecards: 4'' x 5 1/4''; gift enclosures: 2 3/4'' x 3 3/4''




Art History

A master of many media, Louis Comfort Tiffany (American, 18481933) was one of Americas most noted decorative artists at the turn of the twentieth century. In the early 1890s he developed a method of blending different colors together in glass while it was in a molten state, thus achieving subtle effects of shading and texture. The artist called this type of glass, which was often noted for its iridescence, Favrile glass (from fabrile, an Old English word meaning hand-wrought).


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