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Egyptian Hieroglyphs Rollerball Pen

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Price: $195.00
Member Price: $175.50

Item# 80-006732 







Description

The Museums Egyptian Hieroglyphs Rollerball Pen features hieroglyphs taken from a traditional offering inscription on a false door belonging to Metjetji, a noble of the Old Kingdom, who was the Director of the Office of the Tenants of the Palace under King Unis of Dynasty 5 (ca. 23532323 B.C.). The Egyptians used the hieroglyphic script for nearly 3,500 years, from about 3100 B.C. until the end of the third century A.D. A highly complex form of writing, the script was the specialty of a limited number of professional scribes. The glyphs on our pen include a jackal, a snake, several species of birds, a water sign, and more.

Rollerball, black ink, medium point type, 0.7mm tip. Resin barrel and clip with lacquer and gold overlay. Screw-top cap. 5''L. Presented in black hinged lacquered wood gift box.

Refillable. Uses Sheaffer 97535, Pelikan 338 or Schmidt 5888 refill.

  • Resin barrel and clip with lacquer and gold overlay
  • Refillable. Uses Sheaffer 97535, Pelikan 338 or Schmidt 5888 refill
  • Screw-top cap
  • Rollerball
  • Black ink, medium point type, 0.7mm tip
  • Presented in black hinged lacquered wood gift box
  • 5''L

Art History

Some hieroglyphs were simplified pictures of the objects they were intended to represent. For example, a wavy line meant water. The Egyptians also used hieroglyphs phonetically, combining sounds associated with two or more pictures to make a word that could not be illustrated by a picture. For example, if we could do this in English, an equivalent would be to spell belief with pictures of a bee and a leaf. Because English and ancient Egyptian do not come from the same language family, some sounds used by the Egyptians are not used in spoken English, and some of our sounds, for example, L, did not exist in ancient Egyptian.

Customer Reviews




Description

The Museums Egyptian Hieroglyphs Rollerball Pen features hieroglyphs taken from a traditional offering inscription on a false door belonging to Metjetji, a noble of the Old Kingdom, who was the Director of the Office of the Tenants of the Palace under King Unis of Dynasty 5 (ca. 23532323 B.C.). The Egyptians used the hieroglyphic script for nearly 3,500 years, from about 3100 B.C. until the end of the third century A.D. A highly complex form of writing, the script was the specialty of a limited number of professional scribes. The glyphs on our pen include a jackal, a snake, several species of birds, a water sign, and more.

Rollerball, black ink, medium point type, 0.7mm tip. Resin barrel and clip with lacquer and gold overlay. Screw-top cap. 5''L. Presented in black hinged lacquered wood gift box.

Refillable. Uses Sheaffer 97535, Pelikan 338 or Schmidt 5888 refill.





  • Resin barrel and clip with lacquer and gold overlay
  • Refillable. Uses Sheaffer 97535, Pelikan 338 or Schmidt 5888 refill
  • Screw-top cap
  • Rollerball
  • Black ink, medium point type, 0.7mm tip
  • Presented in black hinged lacquered wood gift box
  • 5''L




Art History

Some hieroglyphs were simplified pictures of the objects they were intended to represent. For example, a wavy line meant water. The Egyptians also used hieroglyphs phonetically, combining sounds associated with two or more pictures to make a word that could not be illustrated by a picture. For example, if we could do this in English, an equivalent would be to spell belief with pictures of a bee and a leaf. Because English and ancient Egyptian do not come from the same language family, some sounds used by the Egyptians are not used in spoken English, and some of our sounds, for example, L, did not exist in ancient Egyptian.


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