Skip to content

Japanese Inro Jeweled Peacock Pin

Pinterest

SALE
Price: $95.00 $47.50
Member Price: $85.50 $42.75

Item# 80-015777 







Description

Stacked, nested boxes, called inro, were specifically designed to hold medicine or ink seals. Often made of lavishly decorated lacquer, these costly and beautiful inro (primarily used by men) became essential fashion accessories that also acted as markers of wealth. In addition to the tiny nested boxes that make up the inro, exquisite details can be seen on the netsuke, the decorative toggle that helps secure the inro to the sash, and also on the ojime, the bead that secures the cord. Our pin has been adapted from a regal peacock adorning a Meiji-period (18681912) inro in the Museums collection.

24K gold overlay, hand enameled, made with SWAROVSKI ELEMENTS. 4''L x 1''W.

  • 24K gold overlay, hand enameled
  • MADE WITH SWAROVSKI ELEMENTS
  • 4''L x 1''W

Art History

In Edo Japan (16151868), citizens of all classes wore the kimono, a simple T-shaped robe with no pockets. For carrying small essentials, ingeniously constructed containers were suspended on cords from the kimonos waist sash.

Customer Reviews




Description

Stacked, nested boxes, called inro, were specifically designed to hold medicine or ink seals. Often made of lavishly decorated lacquer, these costly and beautiful inro (primarily used by men) became essential fashion accessories that also acted as markers of wealth. In addition to the tiny nested boxes that make up the inro, exquisite details can be seen on the netsuke, the decorative toggle that helps secure the inro to the sash, and also on the ojime, the bead that secures the cord. Our pin has been adapted from a regal peacock adorning a Meiji-period (18681912) inro in the Museums collection.

24K gold overlay, hand enameled, made with SWAROVSKI ELEMENTS. 4''L x 1''W.





  • 24K gold overlay, hand enameled
  • MADE WITH SWAROVSKI ELEMENTS
  • 4''L x 1''W




Art History

In Edo Japan (16151868), citizens of all classes wore the kimono, a simple T-shaped robe with no pockets. For carrying small essentials, ingeniously constructed containers were suspended on cords from the kimonos waist sash.


You May Also Like

Your Recently Viewed Items

    click to view next item

    Help And Information