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Sardis Column Bookends

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Price: $115.00
Member Price: $103.50

Item# 06-011639 







Description

Our bookend reproductions are adapted from a marble column from a temple dedicated to Artemis that was begun at Sardis, the capital at Lydia, around the turn of the third century B.C. It was one of the largest Greek temples, with original Ionic columns that stood 56 feet high. A portion of one such column, including the capital, base, and sections of the shaft, is a focal point at the entry to the Museum's Greek and Roman galleries, and has been reproduced in careful detail to reveal the fine foliate carving of the capital and the fish-scale molding of the base.

Includes 2 bookends. Cast resin. Hand patinated. 9 1/2''H including base; 4 1/2'' square base.

Sorry, gift wrap is not available for this item.

  • Includes 2 bookends
  • Cast resin, hand patinated
  • 9 1/2''H including base; 4 1/2'' square base
  • Gift wrap not available

Art History

The capital, base, and portions of the shaft of an Ionic column, now in the Museums collection, come from a monumental temple constructed at Sardis, the capital of Lydia in Asia Minor (now Turkey). Construction began about 300 B.C., with the final phase of construction taking place in A.D. 150. The temple, dedicated to Artemis, the Greek goddess of the hunt and of the moon, ranks among the seven largest of all Greek temples. The original column would have risen to a height of fifty-six feet and was part of one of two similar pairs of columns that would have stood in the east and west porches of the temple. The shortened form of the column, now in the Museum, allows the viewer to appreciate the fine carving of the foliate ornaments on the capital as well as the fish-scale pattern on the torus molding at its base.

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Description

Our bookend reproductions are adapted from a marble column from a temple dedicated to Artemis that was begun at Sardis, the capital at Lydia, around the turn of the third century B.C. It was one of the largest Greek temples, with original Ionic columns that stood 56 feet high. A portion of one such column, including the capital, base, and sections of the shaft, is a focal point at the entry to the Museum's Greek and Roman galleries, and has been reproduced in careful detail to reveal the fine foliate carving of the capital and the fish-scale molding of the base.

Includes 2 bookends. Cast resin. Hand patinated. 9 1/2''H including base; 4 1/2'' square base.

Sorry, gift wrap is not available for this item.





  • Includes 2 bookends
  • Cast resin, hand patinated
  • 9 1/2''H including base; 4 1/2'' square base
  • Gift wrap not available




Art History

The capital, base, and portions of the shaft of an Ionic column, now in the Museums collection, come from a monumental temple constructed at Sardis, the capital of Lydia in Asia Minor (now Turkey). Construction began about 300 B.C., with the final phase of construction taking place in A.D. 150. The temple, dedicated to Artemis, the Greek goddess of the hunt and of the moon, ranks among the seven largest of all Greek temples. The original column would have risen to a height of fifty-six feet and was part of one of two similar pairs of columns that would have stood in the east and west porches of the temple. The shortened form of the column, now in the Museum, allows the viewer to appreciate the fine carving of the foliate ornaments on the capital as well as the fish-scale pattern on the torus molding at its base.


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