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Pérussis: Altarpiece Angel Holiday Cards

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Price: $17.95 $8.98
Member Price: $16.15 $8.08

Item# 80-010297 







Description

The angel dancing across these holiday cards depicts a detail from The Prussis Altarpiece featuring three panels with oil and gold on wood, completed in 1480 and now in the Museums collection. (I bring you good tidings of great joy)

20 cards and 20 envelopes per box. 4 7/8'' x 6 1/4''.

  • 20 cards and 20 envelopes per box
  • 4 7/8'' x 6 1/4''
  • Without greeting

Art History

Artists of Provence during the fifteenth century created extraordinary paintings, including the Prussis Altarpiece, which The Metropolitan Museum of Art acquired in 1954. The original altarpiece is divided by its frame into five sections. The central panel depicts a tall, simple wooden cross bearing the inscription at the top and three nails marking the position of the absent body of Christ. Within the panels flanking this central scene are men kneeling and looking up at the cross, hands clasped in prayer. Represented in fifteenth-century contemporary garb, it is clear that these are portraits of donors, and the artist has gone to great lengths to evoke their personalities. Behind each man is a saint: on the left side is Saint John the Baptist in his goatskin tunic and red cloak, while on the right is Saint Francis in the habit of his order holding a crucifix. Both saints have a quiet, tender expression, and the artist seems to have wanted to emphasize their connection with the kneeling figures by grouping them very closely together. The two outer panels of the altarpiece show shields with armorial bearings, surmounted by a crested helm with mantle and a scroll that reads datum est de super. One of the most intriguing aspects of the original painting is the exquisite detail the artist has shown in the surrounding landscape of Avignon, as well as the many meticulously rendered symbols in the foreground.

Recent research indicates that the two donors in the foreground are probably members of the Prussis family of Avignon, although they (along with the artist) have not yet been positively identified. According to an inscription on the original frame, the altarpiece was made in 1480 for Aloisius Rudolphe de Prussis, whose family coat of arms and motto are displayed in the side panels. One of the kneeling donors may be Aloisius himself. Originally from Florence, the Prussis or Peruzzi took refuge in Avignon after they were exiled by Cosimo de' Medici in 1434. The simple forms and clear realism in the altarpiece are characteristic features of the Avignon school, recalling the art of Nicolas Froment, who was active in Provence between 1450 and 1490.

Customer Reviews




Description

The angel dancing across these holiday cards depicts a detail from The Prussis Altarpiece featuring three panels with oil and gold on wood, completed in 1480 and now in the Museums collection. (I bring you good tidings of great joy)

20 cards and 20 envelopes per box. 4 7/8'' x 6 1/4''.





  • 20 cards and 20 envelopes per box
  • 4 7/8'' x 6 1/4''
  • Without greeting




Art History

Artists of Provence during the fifteenth century created extraordinary paintings, including the Prussis Altarpiece, which The Metropolitan Museum of Art acquired in 1954. The original altarpiece is divided by its frame into five sections. The central panel depicts a tall, simple wooden cross bearing the inscription at the top and three nails marking the position of the absent body of Christ. Within the panels flanking this central scene are men kneeling and looking up at the cross, hands clasped in prayer. Represented in fifteenth-century contemporary garb, it is clear that these are portraits of donors, and the artist has gone to great lengths to evoke their personalities. Behind each man is a saint: on the left side is Saint John the Baptist in his goatskin tunic and red cloak, while on the right is Saint Francis in the habit of his order holding a crucifix. Both saints have a quiet, tender expression, and the artist seems to have wanted to emphasize their connection with the kneeling figures by grouping them very closely together. The two outer panels of the altarpiece show shields with armorial bearings, surmounted by a crested helm with mantle and a scroll that reads datum est de super. One of the most intriguing aspects of the original painting is the exquisite detail the artist has shown in the surrounding landscape of Avignon, as well as the many meticulously rendered symbols in the foreground.

Recent research indicates that the two donors in the foreground are probably members of the Prussis family of Avignon, although they (along with the artist) have not yet been positively identified. According to an inscription on the original frame, the altarpiece was made in 1480 for Aloisius Rudolphe de Prussis, whose family coat of arms and motto are displayed in the side panels. One of the kneeling donors may be Aloisius himself. Originally from Florence, the Prussis or Peruzzi took refuge in Avignon after they were exiled by Cosimo de' Medici in 1434. The simple forms and clear realism in the altarpiece are characteristic features of the Avignon school, recalling the art of Nicolas Froment, who was active in Provence between 1450 and 1490.



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