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Peacock Feather Embroidered Wristlet

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Price: $25.00
Member Price: $22.50

Item# 80-015657 







Description

Our elegant wristlet is based on stylized peacock feathers depicted in a color pochoir (stencil) print in Combinaisons Ornementales, published about 1901 in Paris. Considered the bible of decorative Art Nouveau elements, this exceptional portfolio of patterns and designs, a copy of which is in the Museums collection, was created by Georges Auriol (pseudonym for Jean-Georges Huyot, (French, 18631938), Alphonse Maria Mucha (Czech, 18601939), and Maurice Pillard Verneuil (French, 18691942).

Rayon velvet. Top-zip closure. 5''H x 9''W.

  • Rayon velvet
  • Top-zip closure
  • 5''H x 9''W

Art History

Favored for its shimmering exoticism by champions of the Aesthetic and Art Nouveau movements, the peacock feather enjoyed a lively vogue as a design motif in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Its graceful silhouette and rich, iridescent hues were adapted to every manner of the decorative arts: textiles and graphic design; porcelain, glass and metalwork; even furniture and interior decoration.

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Description

Our elegant wristlet is based on stylized peacock feathers depicted in a color pochoir (stencil) print in Combinaisons Ornementales, published about 1901 in Paris. Considered the bible of decorative Art Nouveau elements, this exceptional portfolio of patterns and designs, a copy of which is in the Museums collection, was created by Georges Auriol (pseudonym for Jean-Georges Huyot, (French, 18631938), Alphonse Maria Mucha (Czech, 18601939), and Maurice Pillard Verneuil (French, 18691942).

Rayon velvet. Top-zip closure. 5''H x 9''W.





  • Rayon velvet
  • Top-zip closure
  • 5''H x 9''W




Art History

Favored for its shimmering exoticism by champions of the Aesthetic and Art Nouveau movements, the peacock feather enjoyed a lively vogue as a design motif in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Its graceful silhouette and rich, iridescent hues were adapted to every manner of the decorative arts: textiles and graphic design; porcelain, glass and metalwork; even furniture and interior decoration.


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