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Cloisters Ground Ivy Watch

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Price: $125.00
Member Price: $112.50

Item# 80-009145 







Description

Our glamorous watch design is based on an original fifteenth-century woodcut illustrating ground ivy in the Museums collection. The three enclosed gardens at The Cloisters are treasures in themselves, each with its own delightful character. Together they illuminate the important role that plants played in medieval art and life, from the medicinal to the allegorical. Ground ivy (Glechoma hederacea), a creeping perennial herb in the mint family, is grown at The Cloisters. According to a sixth- century treatise, it could treat bladder stones, ailments affecting hearing and smell, headache caused by heat, and the bite of creeping things.

24K gold overlay with mother-of-pearl dial. Quartz movement. Band: adjusts from 6 1/4''L to 7 1/4''L with 2 removable links.

  • 24K gold overlay
  • Mother-of-pearl dial
  • Quartz movement
  • Band: adjusts from 6 1/4''L to 7 1/4''L with 2 removable links

Art History

BEHIND THE SCENE: IN A MEDIEVAL GARDEN
Deirdre Larkin
Horticulturist, The Cloisters Museum and Gardens

The three enclosed gardens at The Cloisters have been an integral part of the Museum since 1938, and are counted among its treasures. Planted in reconstructed Romanesque and Gothic cloisters, the gardens evoke those found within medieval monasteries and convents. Monastic gardens provided food and medicine as well as natural beauty and spiritual refreshment. Our gardens are places of beauty and contemplation, and can be enjoyed simply as a retreat from urban life, or as a setting for a great collection of medieval art and architecture. They also contain many edible, medicinal, and useful plants, as well as symbolic plants, functioning as living laboratories for the study of the Middle Ages. To the medieval mind, all of life was connected, and plants were part of the very structure of life and art. The gardens of The Cloisters open a door into the medieval world.

Each of the three gardens has its own character. The Cuxa Cloister Garth Garden is the Museums main ornamental garden. The plan is typically medieval, but both medieval species and modern garden plants are grown to provide color and scent from springtime through fall. The Bonnefont Cloister Herb Garden holds one of the most specialized plant collections in the world, organized by use (i.e., magical, medicinal, culinary). It is a challenging garden, because the plants grouped together under such headings may have very different horticultural requirements. Here you can see rare species that you wont see elsewhere, such as mandrake or henbane. You may also learn to appreciate very ordinary plants: ground ivy is considered to be a common weed, but it has a place of honor in the bed of Magical Plants in Bonnefont Garden. Trie Cloister Garden, home to a collection of plants native to European meadows, woodlands, and stream banks, evokes the flowering grounds of medieval millefleurs tapestries.

A garden tour can be a gratifying sensory experience, and an intellectually stimulating one, for both visitors and lecturers. Many people have an immediate response to plants, and a natural curiosity about them. Time spent in the gardens can help visitors to connect with the medieval past presented in the galleries. Seeing the plants represented in the collection also living and growing outside in the gardens is one of the perennial pleasures of a visit to The Cloisters.

The gardens inspire curiosity and enthusiasm as well as providing quiet enjoyment. People have been known to develop a profound attachment to favorite plants, such as the espaliered pear and the beloved quince trees, which have grown at The Cloisters since the 1950s and are now an icon of the Museum. The popular Garden Days at The Cloisters, a themed event held the first weekend in June, attracts many visitors each year.

The position of horticulturist at The Cloisters is unique. The job is physical and sensory as well as intellectually gratifying. It entails finding, planting, growing, researching, and interpreting hundreds of plants. The work changes with the seasons, from daily planting and sowing in the spring to putting the gardens to bed for the winter. In a given season, the weather, not the gardeners, often determines which plants flourish and which decline.

Year-round, The Cloisters is a truly special place to work and visit.

Customer Reviews




Description

Our glamorous watch design is based on an original fifteenth-century woodcut illustrating ground ivy in the Museums collection. The three enclosed gardens at The Cloisters are treasures in themselves, each with its own delightful character. Together they illuminate the important role that plants played in medieval art and life, from the medicinal to the allegorical. Ground ivy (Glechoma hederacea), a creeping perennial herb in the mint family, is grown at The Cloisters. According to a sixth- century treatise, it could treat bladder stones, ailments affecting hearing and smell, headache caused by heat, and the bite of creeping things.

24K gold overlay with mother-of-pearl dial. Quartz movement. Band: adjusts from 6 1/4''L to 7 1/4''L with 2 removable links.





  • 24K gold overlay
  • Mother-of-pearl dial
  • Quartz movement
  • Band: adjusts from 6 1/4''L to 7 1/4''L with 2 removable links




Art History

BEHIND THE SCENE: IN A MEDIEVAL GARDEN
Deirdre Larkin
Horticulturist, The Cloisters Museum and Gardens

The three enclosed gardens at The Cloisters have been an integral part of the Museum since 1938, and are counted among its treasures. Planted in reconstructed Romanesque and Gothic cloisters, the gardens evoke those found within medieval monasteries and convents. Monastic gardens provided food and medicine as well as natural beauty and spiritual refreshment. Our gardens are places of beauty and contemplation, and can be enjoyed simply as a retreat from urban life, or as a setting for a great collection of medieval art and architecture. They also contain many edible, medicinal, and useful plants, as well as symbolic plants, functioning as living laboratories for the study of the Middle Ages. To the medieval mind, all of life was connected, and plants were part of the very structure of life and art. The gardens of The Cloisters open a door into the medieval world.

Each of the three gardens has its own character. The Cuxa Cloister Garth Garden is the Museums main ornamental garden. The plan is typically medieval, but both medieval species and modern garden plants are grown to provide color and scent from springtime through fall. The Bonnefont Cloister Herb Garden holds one of the most specialized plant collections in the world, organized by use (i.e., magical, medicinal, culinary). It is a challenging garden, because the plants grouped together under such headings may have very different horticultural requirements. Here you can see rare species that you wont see elsewhere, such as mandrake or henbane. You may also learn to appreciate very ordinary plants: ground ivy is considered to be a common weed, but it has a place of honor in the bed of Magical Plants in Bonnefont Garden. Trie Cloister Garden, home to a collection of plants native to European meadows, woodlands, and stream banks, evokes the flowering grounds of medieval millefleurs tapestries.

A garden tour can be a gratifying sensory experience, and an intellectually stimulating one, for both visitors and lecturers. Many people have an immediate response to plants, and a natural curiosity about them. Time spent in the gardens can help visitors to connect with the medieval past presented in the galleries. Seeing the plants represented in the collection also living and growing outside in the gardens is one of the perennial pleasures of a visit to The Cloisters.

The gardens inspire curiosity and enthusiasm as well as providing quiet enjoyment. People have been known to develop a profound attachment to favorite plants, such as the espaliered pear and the beloved quince trees, which have grown at The Cloisters since the 1950s and are now an icon of the Museum. The popular Garden Days at The Cloisters, a themed event held the first weekend in June, attracts many visitors each year.

The position of horticulturist at The Cloisters is unique. The job is physical and sensory as well as intellectually gratifying. It entails finding, planting, growing, researching, and interpreting hundreds of plants. The work changes with the seasons, from daily planting and sowing in the spring to putting the gardens to bed for the winter. In a given season, the weather, not the gardeners, often determines which plants flourish and which decline.

Year-round, The Cloisters is a truly special place to work and visit.



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