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Jeweled Locket Watch

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Price: $175.00
Member Price: $157.50

Item# 80-015819 







Description

In the Museums collection is a sumptuous gold watch (ca. 1750) inside a gold case that is thickly set with more than 90 diamonds. The watch is signed on the movement by noted London clockmaker maker Richard Peckover (active 173756); the dial is signed Markwick, Markham and Perigal, London, which was one of the few firms allowed by the Turkish sultan to sell English watches in Istanbul. The glittering outer case was likely made in India or possibly in Turkey. Our stunning locket watch is based on this eighteenth-century treasure.

18K gold overlay, made with SWAROVSKI ELEMENTS. Quartz movement. Lobster claw closure. Case: 1 1/4'' diam.; chain: 32''L.

  • 18K gold overlay
  • MADE WITH SWAROVSKI ELEMENTS
  • Quartz movement
  • Case: 1 1/4'' diam.; chain: 32''L
  • Lobster claw closure

Art History

The development of the multifaceted, brilliant-cut for diamonds toward the end of the seventeenth century improved on previous techniques and gave diamonds an incredible sparkle. This resulted in a fashion for gemstone jewelry that dominated throughout the eighteenth century.

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Description

In the Museums collection is a sumptuous gold watch (ca. 1750) inside a gold case that is thickly set with more than 90 diamonds. The watch is signed on the movement by noted London clockmaker maker Richard Peckover (active 173756); the dial is signed Markwick, Markham and Perigal, London, which was one of the few firms allowed by the Turkish sultan to sell English watches in Istanbul. The glittering outer case was likely made in India or possibly in Turkey. Our stunning locket watch is based on this eighteenth-century treasure.

18K gold overlay, made with SWAROVSKI ELEMENTS. Quartz movement. Lobster claw closure. Case: 1 1/4'' diam.; chain: 32''L.





  • 18K gold overlay
  • MADE WITH SWAROVSKI ELEMENTS
  • Quartz movement
  • Case: 1 1/4'' diam.; chain: 32''L
  • Lobster claw closure




Art History

The development of the multifaceted, brilliant-cut for diamonds toward the end of the seventeenth century improved on previous techniques and gave diamonds an incredible sparkle. This resulted in a fashion for gemstone jewelry that dominated throughout the eighteenth century.


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