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Charles-Albert Arnoux Bertall: Saltimbanques Print

80037316 New
Item # 80037316
Charles-Albert Arnoux Bertall: Saltimbanques Print is rated 5.0 out of 5 by 1.
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Price: 20$20.00
Member Price: 18$18.00
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Description

Charles-Albert Arnoux Bertall (French, 1820–1882), Saltimbanques, from Le Diable à Paris, vol II (Paris, 1846), p. 161.

Charles Albert, vicomte d'Arnoux, who called himself Bertall, was a caricaturist, writer, and illustrator for popular novels and newspapers. Our print has been reproduced from his wood engraving Saltimbanques in The Met collection. It initially appeared in the multi-authored and lavishly illustrated Le Diable à Paris (The Devil in Paris), a lampoon of the city's morals published in 1846, and it was widely recycled, even in a New York publication. The imagery of the parade, or sideshow, was widely shared in the period's illustrations and cartoons, and was associated with political chicanery throughout the reign of King Louis-Phillipe (1830–48), the short-lived Second Republic, and the Second Empire (1852–70). While Bertall's image presents simple grotesques, the accompanying text on saltimbanques, or entertainers, accentuates the parallels between sideshows and politics.

Charles-Albert Arnoux Bertall (French, 1820–1882), Saltimbanques, from Le Diable à Paris, vol II (Paris, 1846), p. 161.

Charles Albert, vicomte d'Arnoux, who called himself Bertall, was a caricaturist, writer, and illustrator for popular novels and newspapers. Our print has been reproduced from his wood engraving Saltimbanques in The Met collection. It initially appeared in the multi-authored and lavishly illustrated Le Diable à Paris (The Devil in Paris), a lampoon of the city's morals published in 1846, and it was widely recycled, even in a New York publication. The imagery of the parade, or sideshow, was widely shared in the period's illustrations and cartoons, and was associated with political chicanery throughout the reign of King Louis-Phillipe (1830–48), the...See More

Details
  • Printed by Met Imaging
  • Digital reproduction
  • 16'' x 20''
  • Gift wrap not available
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Rated 5 out of 5 by from Is it right to say “It’s fun!”? I bought this because I like it and thought it would liven up my guest bath. I’m so tired of the ordinary fare of flowers, semi- nude nymphs, etc. I must have boring friends. They are speechless. Maybe that is good. Maybe I need new friends.
Date published: 2017-12-21
  • y_2018, m_9, d_21, h_19
  • bvseo_bulk, prod_bvrr, vn_bulk_2.0.8
  • cp_1, bvpage1
  • co_hasreviews, tv_0, tr_1
  • loc_en_US, sid_80037316, prod, sort_[SortEntry(order=RELEVANCE, direction=DESCENDING)]
  • clientName_metropolitanmuseumofart
  • bvseo_sdk, p_sdk, 3.2.0
  • CLOUD, getReviews, 69.02ms
  • REVIEWS, PRODUCT